Dead Poets Society

Updated: Jul 8


Dead Poets Society

There are some films that, if seen for the first time at the proper age, may inspire and embolden you: Dead Poets Society is one of them. 

It is uncynical, optimistic, and naive – not necessarily traits associated with cinema snobs – but what it lacks in critical acclaim it makes up for in public enjoyment.


"Dead Poets Society" is a compilation of sanctimonious clichés disguised as a brave stance in support of something: doing your own thing.

It's about a perplexed, unorthodox English teacher and his pupils at "America's top prep school," and how he encourages them to question conventional wisdom by doing things like standing on their desks.


"Passing from childhood to adulthood generally involves a transition from following the norms and regulations of social authorities such as parents and teachers to making morally autonomous judgments about future activities based on one's own views and ideas. "

The film “Dead Poets Society” depicts an English professor who is both inspirational and unsettling.

This is the narrative of pupils from the prestigious "Welton Academy."


Welton Academy

Mr. Keating, a youthful and vibrant English and poetry teacher who is committed to educating his students to live life with total enthusiasm.


Mr. Keating inspired his students to develop a passion for poetry and learning that transcended their normally organized and regulated scholastic lives.

He may breach boundaries that a person in a position of power and respect should not cross.




John Keating is the charismatic, energetic English teacher who inspires the students of Welton Academy to rebel against their families and other teachers. His name echoes that of John Keats, the famous English Romantic poet whose celebration of life and originality may have inspired Keating’s own. 

Keating begins teaching at Welton and immediately surprises his students, who aren’t used to anything more than the routine bookish lectures shoved down their ears.


Mr. Keating

Keating urges his students to “seize the day”(Carpe Diem)—that is, do extraordinary, original things instead of merely imitating what their teachers and seniors. His example inspires the students to revive a secret society of which Keating was once a member—the Dead Poets Society.



Keating’s emphasis on freedom and originality raises many eyebrows at Welton, a school that celebrates tradition above everything else.

Dead Poets Society REVIEW

When his students begin to fight back against the Welton administration more and more overtly, Keating tries to convince his students to be more reserved and cautious in their behavior—significantly, he urges Neil Perry to talk to his father about his love for acting.

After Neil’s tragic suicide—brought about in part because Neil did not talk to his father—Keating is blamed for “corrupting” his students and fired from Welton.


Neil’s tragic suicide

Passing from childhood to adulthood generally involves a transition from following the norms and regulations of social authorities such as parents and teachers to making morally autonomous judgments about future activities based on one's own views and ideas.


This route is sometimes a tough one, and individuals who travel it are generally assisted by mentors from whom they can seek assistance.

This film depicts what occurs when these pupils decide to pursue their own interests and live their lives with the enthusiasm that Mr. Keating instilled in them.


Actually, it's about what happens when a group of idealistic students is challenged with conservative forces who oppose any change, even the desire for personal self-determination.

According to the movie, the values and beliefs of any society are the instruments that form individuals in that culture.

Students are expected to be directed by the school's views and ideals.


Peter Weir's Dead Poets Society

Peter Weir's Dead Poets Society professes to be about the bravery and valor of forging one's own path. 
This is a dazzling, sparkling lie, one that the film is bold enough to tell you right in front of your face. 

It punishes individuals who march to the rhythm of a different drummer by stomping on them with the drum set.

Those that stay in line get to cover their asses before making phony compassion motions toward the individuals they helped ruin.


It would be difficult to discover a more conformist, less inspiring piece of the movie.




Author: Sriharsh Aditya

Editor: Akash Rupam Ekka


sources:

-https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.thecut.com%2F2012%2F11%2F24-reasons-to-dress-like-the-dead-poets-society.html&psig=AOvVaw05rcVX95V1O4xtJjSFjOq3&ust=1635312368543000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAsQjRxqFwoTCLDNzLqr5_MCFQAAAAAdAAAAABAm

-https://d2j1wkp1bavyfs.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/Dead-Poets-01.jpg?q=50

-https://i.ytimg.com/vi/j64SctPKmqk/maxresdefault.jpg

-https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/proxy/B7L7HKx5XVB5xBt-S7Afw8316r6POpl9ADDVZgop2g_WQQn0y4CP3ko6ZrP8cEJ1J41NjuXcNvCq93-sORgcTesZTrCnnngVERIbXmCdvxNVgthVwfw57D3ADkAGqBzSlTfekw

-https://i.pinimg.com/736x/59/cd/15/59cd1535ffd6066035d60d089e6f8dea.jpg